Research Based Practice

Both Practice-Based Research (PBR) and Research-Creation take part in an increasingly popular yet variously defined field of activity. Identifying effective and appropriate parameters for these approaches that are sufficiently flexible yet rigorous, particularly in terms of methodology, remains a central topic of discussion and debate on an international scale. This panel presents two specific responses that advocate increased precision in articulation and design. Panelists: Pil Hansen, Bruce Barton, and Anna Friz.

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Public Philosophy: A Manifesto Workshop, Part 2

From Latin, manifestare: to make public, to reveal, disclose, clarify. This workshop explored the dimensions of the manifesto’s performativity: an act of self-situating and self-explicating; writing towards an invisible public or a people-to-come; as a critical practice; thinking the manifesto as a genre vs. the manifesto as a highly contextualized act. The podcast features the second part of this workshop which included presentations/performances in manifesto form. Participants: Ana Bigotte Vieira, Franziska Bork Petersen, Shane Boyle, Laura Cull, Will Daddario, Matthew Goulish, Lin Hixson, Beth Hoffmann, Esa Kirkkopelto.

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In Conversation with Cardiff/Miller

A conversation between performance theorist Amelia Jones and Canadian audio installation artists Janet Cardiff and Georges Bures Miller about their show Ship O’Fools, presented in Trinity Bellwoods Park during the conference as part of the 2010 Luminato Festival.

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Women & Performance: a roundtable of feminist performance studies

Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory has been continuously operating as a feminist editorial collective for the past twenty-five years. The journal’s two intellectual occupations are feminism and performance scholarship, both broadly construed. As feminist politics and performance theory have evolved and expanded, so too have the practices of the editorial collective. While the two keywords of the journal’s title remain, what sustains our engagement with them is a collective practice that itself shifts in relation not only to expanding understandings of the keywords, but also to changing realities in the university and publishing institutions within which we operate. We use this observation to reflect not just on the history of Women & Performance, but on both the rewards and challenges of collectivity for generating new forms of feminist scholarship. This roundtable features a cross-section of collective members, guest editors, authors and artists who have contributed to this ongoing project. Panelists: Alicia Arrizón, Barbara Browning, Karen Finley, Elizabeth Kurkjian.

Download the audio from this podcast here, or listen to it below.

 

Image from previous page: Site from Garden/ /Suburbia: Mapping the Non-Aristocratic in Lawrence Park created by Melanie Bennett, Hartley Jafine, Andy Houston, and Aaron Collier. A site-specific performance staged at the 2010 Performing Publics conference. The audience is pictured here walking to the next performance site. Photo by Ren Bucholz